run - definition in the American English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “run”

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run

verb  us   /rʌn/ (present participle running, past tense ran  /ræn/ , past participle run)

run verb (GO QUICKLY)

[I/T] to move your legs faster than when walking, with the weight of your body pressing forward: [I] They ran for the bus and got there just in time. [T] Hugh runs five miles a day. [I] We want a place with a big backyard with room for the kids to run around. [I] fig. I’ve got to run now (= hurry away) because I’m late for my appointment.

run verb (TRAVEL/GO)

[I/T] to travel or go, to move something, or to be positioned in a particular way: [I] The bus runs three times a day between here and Albuquerque. [I] I’m going to run down to the bank to cash my check. [I] Trains are running twenty minutes late because of the weather. [I] The car skidded on the ice and ran off the road. [I] A shiver of fear ran through her. [T] John said he’d run me back to school (= take me there in his car). [I] A deep creek runs through the property. [I] The road runs along the coast. [I/T] If you run your finger or hand over something, you move it quickly: [T] She ran her fingers along the edge of the desk. [I/T] If you run something through your hair, you move it quickly and easily: [T] He ran a comb through his hair. [I/T] If a driver or a vehicle runs a sign or signal to stop, the vehicle continues without stopping: [T] Our taxi ran a red light and a truck rammed us in the side.

run verb (OPERATE)

[I/T] to manage or operate something: [T] She runs the business out of her home. [I] She left the engine running while she went into the store. [T] Can you run both of these programs at once? [T] They’re running tests on his heart functions. [I/T] If something runs on a particular type of energy, it uses that type of energy to operate: [I] Some calculators run on solar power .

run verb (FLOW)

[I/T] to cause a liquid to flow, or to produce a liquid that flows: [T] He ran a little cold water into the sink. [I] He has a cold and his nose is running. [I] Tears were running down her face.

run verb (LOSE COLOR)

[I] (of colors) to come out of material and mix with other colors, so that the original colors are lost: If you wash the dress in hot water, the colors will run.

run verb (POLITICS)

[I] to try to get elected; be a candidate : Kutukas ran unsuccessfully for sheriff.

run verb (BE/CONTINUE)

to be, become, or continue in a particular way: [L] The doctor is running a bit late. [L] We’re running low on gas. [I always + adv/prep] Inflation is running at 4%. [I always + adv/prep] The show ran on Broadway for six weeks before closing.

run verb (SHOW)

[T] to show something in a newspaper or magazine, or on television: Both parties are already running campaign ads.

run verb (HOLE)

[I] (of cloth, esp. stockings (= thin, tight-fitting clothing for a woman’s feet and legs)) to develop a long vertical hole: My stockings ran!

run

noun [C]  us   /rʌn/

run noun [C] (POINT)

(in baseball) a single point, scored by touching each of the four bases (= positions on a square) in the correct order

run noun [C] (HOLE)

a long, vertical hole in particular types of cloth, esp. stockings (= thin, tight-fitting clothing for a woman’s feet and legs)

run noun [C] (TRAVELING/GOING)

a trip: The train made its final run in 1986.

run noun [C] (BEING/CONTINUING)

a period during which something happens or continues: The movie starts a two-week run tonight.
(Definition of run from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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