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English definition of “save”

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save

verb  /seɪv/ us  

save verb (MAKE SAFE)

[T] to make or keep someone or something safe from danger or harm, or to bring something back to a satisfactory condition: She jumped into the pool and saved the child from drowning. His leg was partly crushed in the accident but the surgeon was able to save it. Smoke detectors can save lives.

save verb (KEEP)

[I/T] to keep money or something else for use in the future: [I] I’m saving (up) for a new bike and I’ve got almost $100. [T] If you save the receipts from your business trip, the company will reimburse you. [T] I forgot to get milk – will you save my place in line while I get it? [I/T] technology To save information on a computer is to store it in a computer file.

save verb (NOT WASTE)

[I/T] to prevent time, money, or effort from being lost or spent, or to help someone by taking an action to prevent time, money, etc., from being lost: [T] You’ll save time if you take the car. [T] The governor claims he can save the taxpayers $10 million a year. [T] If you’d stop and pick up the kids on your way home, it will save me from having to do it later.
Phrasal verbs

save

noun [C]  /seɪv/ us  

save noun [C] (SPORTS)

(in some sports) the stopping of the ball or other object from going into the goal you are defending: We watched a soccer game on TV, and the goalie made several spectacular saves.

save

preposition  /seɪv/ ( also save for,  /ˈseɪv·fɔr, -fər/) us  

save preposition (EXCEPT)

but or except (for): They found all the lost documents save one. The walls were bare save for a poster.
(Definition of save from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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