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English definition of “scale”

scale

noun  /skeɪl/ us  

scale noun (MEASURING SYSTEM)

[C] a range of numbers used as a system to measure or compare things: Restaurant ratings are on a scale of zero to five stars.

scale noun (SERIES OF MARKS)

[C] a series of marks in a line with regular spaces between them for measuring, or an object for measuring marked in this way: The two scales show inches and centimeters.

scale noun (SIZE/LEVEL)

art [U] the size or level of something in comparison to what is average: Our problems are like those in the city, just on a smaller scale.

scale noun (WEIGHING DEVICE)

[C] a device for weighing people or things: a baby scale a postal scale

scale noun (SIZE RELATIONSHIP)

[C/U] the relationship of the size of a map, drawing, or model of something to the size of the actual thing: [C] The model was built at a 1-inch-to-1-foot scale.

scale noun (MUSIC)

music [C] a set of musical notes in which each note is higher or lower than the previous one by a particular amount: Tyler practices scales on the piano every day.

scale noun (SKIN)

[C usually pl] any of the thin pieces of hard skin covering the bodies of fish, snakes, and lizards

scale

verb [T]  /skeɪl/ us  

scale verb [T] (CLIMB)

to climb up something steep, such as a cliff or wall: He scaled a steep cliff beside the river.
(Definition of scale from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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