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English definition of “score”

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score

verb [I/T]  /skɔr, skoʊr/ us  

score verb [I/T] (WIN)

to win or obtain a point or something else that gives you an advantage in a competitive activity, such as a sport, game, or test: [I] Has either team scored yet? [T] The Packers scored a touchdown with two minutes to go in the football game. [T] A student from Gettysburg scored a perfect 1600 points on the college entrance exam. [T] fig. He scored (= obtained) a deal with a recording label two years ago.

score

noun  /skɔr, skoʊr/ us  

score noun (MUSICAL TEXT)

music [C] a piece of written music showing the parts for all the different instruments and voices, or the music written for a movie or other entertainment

score noun (MATTER)

[C usually sing] a particular matter among others related to it: I’ll let you have the money, so there’s nothing to worry about on that score.

score noun (NUMBER)

[C] (a set or group of) 20: Brandon received cards from scores of (= many) local well-wishers.

score noun (POINTS)

[C] the number of points achieved or obtained in a game or other competition: The final score was 103–90. Who’s going to keep score when we play bridge? infml So what’s the score (= what are the facts of this situation), doctor? Is it serious?
(Definition of score from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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