screen - definition in the American English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “screen”

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screen

noun [C]  us   /skrin/

screen noun [C] (PICTURE)

a flat surface in a theater, on a television, or on a computer system on which pictures or words are shown: I spend most of the day working in front of a computer screen. The screen sometimes means the movies: Her ambition is to write for the screen. a screen actor/actress

screen noun [C] (THING THAT SEPARATES)

something that blocks you from seeing what is behind it, esp. a stiff piece of material that you can stand up like part of a wall and move around: Jennifer has a beautiful screen decorated with Japanese art. A screen is also a stiff, wire net that has very small holes and is fixed within a frame, put in windows esp. in warm weather to let in air and keep insects out.

screen

verb [T]  us   /skrin/

screen verb [T] (EXAMINE)

to test or examine someone or something to discover if there is anything wrong with the person or thing: Airport security staff have to screen and check millions of bags a year. The company president’s secretary screens all his calls (= answers them first to prevent some from getting through).

screen verb [T] (SHOW MOVIE)

to show or broadcast a movie or television program: His new movie got rave reviews when it was screened at Cannes.

screen verb [T] (BLOCK)

to block, protect, or hide someone or something with a screen: She raised her hand to screen her eyes from the sun.
(Definition of screen from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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