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English definition of “seat”

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seat

noun [C]  /sit/ us  

seat noun [C] (PLACE TO SIT)

a piece of furniture or other place for someone to sit: She left her jacket on the back of her seat. I got a seat on the flight to New York. Please take a seat (= sit down). A seat is a part of something on which a person sits: a bicycle seat There’s a piece of gum stuck under the seat of the chair. He stood up and brushed the sand off the seat of his pants.

seat noun [C] (OFFICIAL POSITION)

an official position as a member of a legislature or group of people who control an organization: She decided to run for a seat on the school board.

seat noun [C] (PLACE)

a place that is a center for an important activity, esp. government: Pittsburgh is the county seat of Alleghany County.

seat

verb [T]  /sit/ us  

seat verb [T] (HAVE PLACE TO SIT)

to have or be given a place to sit: I was seated between Jasmine and Emily. The concert hall seats 350. Our group is still waiting to be seated for dinner. Please be seated (= sit down).
(Definition of seat from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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