secure - definition in the American English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “secure”

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secure

adjective  us   /sɪˈkjʊər/

secure adjective (FREE FROM RISK)

free from risk and the threat of change for the worse: a secure job People want to feel secure economically. The museum has a large endowment, so its future is relatively secure. Secure can also mean confident and free from worry: Children need to feel secure in order to do well at school.

secure adjective (FREE FROM DANGER)

free from danger or the threat of harm or unwanted access; safe: Troops were sent to make the border secure. He questioned whether the government’s computer database was secure from hackers. For some time after the robbery we could not feel secure, even in our own home.

secure adjective (FIXED)

fixed, fastened, or locked into a position that prevents movement: That ladder doesn’t look very secure to me. Just check that the door is secure – the lock doesn’t always work.

secure

verb [T]  us   /sɪˈkjʊr/

secure verb [T] (OBTAIN)

to obtain something, sometimes with difficulty: She managed to secure a loan from the bank.

secure verb [T] (FASTEN)

to fasten something firmly: Secure the boat to the dock.

secure verb [T] (MAKE SAFE)

to make sure something is protected from danger or threat: The wall was originally built to secure the town from attack.
(Definition of secure from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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