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English definition of “shade”

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shade

noun  /ʃeɪd/ us  

shade noun (DARKNESS)

[C/U] darkness and cooler temperatures caused by something blocking the direct light from the sun: [U] The truck was parked in the shade. [C/U] A shade is a covering that is put over a light to make it less bright: [C] The lamps had matching shades. [C/U] A shade is also a cover, usually attached at the top of a window, that can be pulled over a window to block the light or to keep people from looking in.

shade noun (DEGREE)

art [C] a degree of darkness of a color: He painted the room a beautiful shade of red. [C] A shade can also mean one type among several: Simple yes-or-no questions can’t reveal all shades of opinion.
Idioms

shade

verb  /ʃeɪd/ us  

shade verb (DARKEN)

[T] to make part of something slightly darker: Students shade the ovals on multiple-choice tests.

shade verb (CHANGE BY DEGREES)

[I/T] to gradually change something, or to gradually change from one thing to another: [I] The sky shaded from pink into red.

shade verb (BLOCK LIGHT)

[T] to prevent direct light from shining on something: She shaded her eyes with her hand. The backyard is shaded by tall oaks.
(Definition of shade from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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