slide - definition in the American English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “slide”

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slide

verb  us   /slɑɪd/ (past tense and past participle slid  /slɪd/ )

slide verb (MOVE EASILY)

to cause something to move easily over a surface, or to move in this way: [I] My mother slid into the car seat next to me. [T] He slid his hand into his back pocket.

slide verb (GET WORSE)

[I] to go into a worse state, often through lack of control or care: The stock market crashed in October 1929 and the nation slid into a depression.

slide

noun  us   /slɑɪd/

slide noun (PHOTOGRAPH)

[C] a small piece of film in a frame which, when light is passed through it, shows a photograph on a screen: The art history professor showed us slides of the Parthenon today. science [C] In scientific study, a slide is a small piece of glass on which you put something in order to look at it through a microscope (= device that makes small objects look larger) and see its structure.

slide noun (WORSE STATE)

[C usually sing] a movement into a worse state, often through lack of control or care: He felt he was on a downward slide in which nothing was going right in his life.

slide noun (STRUCTURE FOR PLAY)

[C] a structure used by children in their play that has a smooth, sloping side which lets them move down quickly from the top to the ground
(Definition of slide from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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