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English definition of “sound”

sound

noun  /sɑʊnd/ us  

sound noun (SOMETHING HEARD)

[C/U] something heard or that may be heard: [C] They could hear the sound of an airplane overhead.

sound noun (WATER PASSAGE)

[C] a passage of sea connecting two larger areas of sea, or an area of sea mostly surrounded by land: Puget Sound Long Island Sound

sound

verb  /sɑʊnd/ us  

sound verb (SEEM)

to suggest a particular feeling, state, or thing by the way something is said or a noise is made: [L] He sounded rather discouraged when I called him yesterday. [I always + adv/prep] You sound as if you have a sore throat. [I always + adv/prep] From what you told me, she sounds like (= seems to be) a nice person. [I always + adv/prep] That sounds like fun (= seems likely to be enjoyable).

sound verb (MAKE NOISE)

[I/T] to make a noise: [I] A bell sounds after fifty minutes to signal the end of the class period. [T] Sound the alarm – a prisoner has escaped!

sound

adjective [-er/-est only]  /sɑʊnd/ us  

sound adjective [-er/-est only] (HEALTHY)

in good condition; (of a person) healthy, or (of a thing) not broken or damaged: a person of sound mind Engineers had to close the bridge because it was not sound. Sound also describes sleep that is deep and peaceful: She was sound asleep when the phone rang.

sound adjective [-er/-est only] (GOOD)

good because based on good judgment or correct methods: It was a sound approach to investing money.
(Definition of sound from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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