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English definition of “spike”

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spike

noun [C]  /spɑɪk/ us  

spike noun [C] (POINT)

a long metal nail used to hold something in place, or a shape that is long and narrow and comes to a point at one end: railroad spikes Spikes are also pointed pieces of metal fixed on the bottom of special shoes, used in some sports to catch in the ground and prevent falling or sliding, or the shoes themselves. A spike is also a sudden increase, often shown on a graph (= type of drawing) by a long, narrow shape that comes to a point at the top: The upward spike in prices was attributed to bad weather in farm areas.

spike

verb [T]  /spɑɪk/ us  

spike verb [T] (MAKE STRONGER)

to add a strong or dangerous substance, usually to a drink or to food: In Hungary you would find yourself eating a local dish of goulash copiously spiked with paprika. fig. Their writing is spiked with a dry, cutting wit.
Translations of “spike”
in Korean 대못…
in Arabic شَوْكة…
in French pointe, crampon…
in Turkish sivri uçlu metal çubuk…
in Italian punta, spunzone…
in Chinese (Traditional) 尖頭,尖刺, (尤指金屬的)尖狀物…
in Russian зубец, шип…
in Polish kolec, szpikulec…
in Spanish punta, pincho, clavo…
in Portuguese ponta…
in German die Spitze, der Laufdorn…
in Catalan punxa…
in Japanese 大くぎ, (靴底の)スパイク…
in Chinese (Simplified) 尖头,尖刺, (尤指金属的)尖状物…
(Definition of spike from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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