stake Meaning in Cambridge American English Dictionary
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Meaning of "stake" - American English Dictionary

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stakenoun [C]

 us   /steɪk/

stake noun [C] (SHARE)

a share in something, esp. a financial share in a business, or an emotional investment in something: He holds a 20% stake in the company. Parents have a large stake in their children’s education. In an activity or competition, the stakes are the costs or risks involved in competing: Global competition has raised the stakes of doing business.

stake noun [C] (RISK)

the amount of money that you risk on the result of a game or competition: Almost everyone has a stake in the global economy these days.

stake noun [C] (POLE)

a thick, strong, pointed wood or metal pole pushed into the ground and used to mark a spot or to support something: Stakes in the ground marked the outline of the new building.
Idioms

stakeverb [T]

 us   /steɪk/

stake verb [T] (RISK)

to risk harming or losing something important: He has talent and ambition, and I’d stake my reputation on his success.

stake verb [T] (FASTEN TO POLE)

to fasten something to a stake: Tomato plants should be staked soon after they are planted.
Translations of “stake”
in Vietnamese cọc…
in Spanish poste…
in Thai เสาหลัก…
in Malaysian pancang pagar…
in French pieu…
in German der Pfahl…
in Chinese (Traditional) 份額, 股本,股份…
in Indonesian pancang…
in Russian доля (в компании), кол, столб…
in Turkish hisse, pay, kazık…
in Chinese (Simplified) 份额, 股本,股份…
in Polish udział, słup…
(Definition of stake from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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