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English definition of “start”

start

verb  /stɑrt/ us  

start verb (BEGIN)

[I/T] to begin to do something or go somewhere, or to begin or happen: [T] When do you start your new job? [I] We started with nothing when we got married. [I] Classes start next month. [I] Work starts at 9:00 a.m. [I] Ticket prices start at $20 (= these are the cheapest prices). [T] I just started this book (= began to read it). [I] We’ll start out with Lucy (= She will be the first). [I/T] infml If you tell someone not to start, you are warning that person not to begin complaining or annoying you: [I] Don’t start – I said no!

start verb (CAUSE)

[T] to cause something to be or happen: His mother started the craft market at the community center. You’ve been starting trouble all morning.

start verb (MOVE SUDDENLY)

[I] to move your body suddenly because something has surprised you: He started when the car backfired.

start verb (OPERATE)

[I/T] to cause something to operate, or to begin to work or operate: [T] Annie went outside to start the car. [I] I heard a lawnmower start.

start

noun  /stɑrt/ us  

start noun (BEGINNING)

[C/U] the time where something begins, or the act of beginning: [U] We were worried from the start. [U] They announced the start of the race. [C] The play got off to a bad start.

start noun (SUDDEN MOVEMENT)

[U] a sudden movement of your body because something has surprised you: He woke with a start when the alarm sounded.
(Definition of start from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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