stick Meaning in Cambridge American English Dictionary
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Meaning of "stick" - American English Dictionary

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sticknoun [C]

 us   /stɪk/

stick noun [C] (THIN PIECE)

a thin piece of wood: The campers collected sticks to start a fire. A stick is also a long, thin handle with a specially shaped end, used esp. to play hockey and lacrosse . A stick can also be a long, thin piece of something: sticks of dynamite a stick of chewing gum

stickverb

 us   /stɪk/ (past tense and past participle stuck  /stʌk/ )

stick verb (PUSH INTO)

[always + adv/prep] to push something pointed into or through something, or to be pushed into or through something: [T] I simply cannot watch when someone sticks a needle in my arm. [I] He throws the knife, and the blade sticks in the wall.

stick verb (ATTACH)

[I/T] to attach or become attached: [T] Stick the tape to the back of the picture. [I] It was so hot that my clothes stuck to me.

stick verb (PUT)

[T always + adv/prep] infml to put something somewhere, usually temporarily: Stick the packages under the table for now.stick out your tongue If you stick out your tongue, you push your tongue out of your mouth, usually as an insult: She stuck her tongue out at him and smiled.Note: This action is usually done by children.

stick verb (BE UNABLE TO MOVE)

[I] to be fixed in position and unable to move: The window sticks, making it hard to shut it.
(Definition of stick from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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