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English definition of “strain”

strain

noun  /streɪn/ us  

strain noun (WORRY)

[C/U] something that causes anxiety, worry, or difficulty: [U] Loss of funding has put a lot of strain on the day-care center. [C] The benefits of keeping our daughter at home make the strains of having only one income worthwhile.

strain noun (PRESSURE)

[U] physical pressure: The bookcase collapsed under the strain.

strain noun (INJURY)

[C] an injury caused by working the muscles too hard: Running puts a strain on your heart.

strain noun (DIFFERENT TYPE)

[C] an animal or plant that is only slightly different from other animals or plants of the same type: A new strain of the virus has been found. [C] A strain is also a quality that gives something a particular character: There has long been a populist strain in American politics. [C] A strain is also a particular sound: Strains of piano music drifted across the room.

strain

verb  /streɪn/ us  

strain verb (SEPARATE)

[I/T] to separate solid pieces from a liquid by pouring it through a utensil with small holes at the bottom of it or through a cloth: [T] Strain the liquid and discard the vegetables.

strain verb (CAUSE WORRY)

[T] to cause anxiety or problems: This relationship has been strained almost to the breaking point. These extra costs have strained our financial resources.

strain verb (CREATE PRESSURE)

[I] to create pressure or use effort: The dog strained at the leash, pulling his master along. [+ to infinitive] I had to strain to hear the audio.

strain verb (CAUSE INJURY)

[T] to cause an injury by working the muscles too hard: I strained my back carrying those boxes.
(Definition of strain from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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