strike - definition in the American English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “strike”

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strike

verb  us   /strɑɪk/ (past tense and past participle struck  /strʌk/ )

strike verb (HIT)

[I/T] to hit or physically attack someone or something: [T] A car struck the man trying to cross a major highway. [T] She was struck in the back of the head by a ball that was thrown across the field. [I/T] If you strike a match, you cause it to burn by rubbing it against a rough surface.

strike verb (CAUSE HARM)

[I/T] (past participle stricken  /ˈstrɪk·ən/ ) to bring sudden harm, damage, or injury to a person or thing: [T] It was a disease that struck mainly young people. [I] Many public health officials fear that a similar flu virus will one day strike again. [T] He was stricken with polio at the age of 13 and lost the use of his legs.

strike verb (STOP WORK)

social studies [I/T] to refuse to continue working because workers or their labor union (= employees’ organization) cannot come to an agreement with an employer over pay or other conditions of the job: [I] Flight attendants are threatening to strike to get more flexible schedules.

strike verb (CAUSE AN IDEA)

[T] to cause someone to have a feeling or idea about something: From what you’ve said, it strikes me that you would be better off working for someone else. I was struck by her sincerity. [T] To strike also means to suddenly cause someone to think of something: I was immediately struck by the similarities in their appearance.

strike verb (DISCOVER)

[T] to discover something such as oil, gas, gold, etc., underground at a particular place: to strike gold/oil

strike verb (AGREE)

[T] to agree to or achieve a solution: My children and I have struck a deal – they can play any kind of music they want as long as I don’t hear it. [T] If you strike a balance between two things, you try to give an equal amount of attention or importance to each: It’s a question of striking the right balance between quality and productivity.

strike verb (SHOW THE TIME)

[I/T] (esp. of a clock) to make a sound or a series of sounds that show the time: [T] The clock struck midnight.

strike

noun  us   /strɑɪk/

strike noun (HIT)

strike noun (REFUSAL TO WORK)

[C/U] a period of time when workers refuse to continue working because they cannot come to an agreement with an employer: [U] If the teachers go on strike again and close the schools down, I don’t know what I’ll do with the kids.
(Definition of strike from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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