sweep Meaning in Cambridge American English Dictionary
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Meaning of "sweep" - American English Dictionary

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sweepverb

 us   /swip/ (past tense and past participle swept  /swept/ )

sweep verb (CLEAN)

[I/T] to clean a floor or other surface by using a brush to collect the dirt into one place from which it can be removed: [T] She sweeps the street in front of her house. [M] The classroom is filthy – could you sweep it out? [I] I swept under every piece of furniture.

sweep verb (REMOVE)

[T always + adv/prep] to remove or take something in a particular direction, esp. suddenly and with force: She paused, sweeping a hair from her brow. [M] Floodwaters were sweeping away gardens and driving residents to higher ground.

sweep verb (MOVE)

[I/T] to move quickly and sometimes forcefully: [I always + adv/prep] A stiff breeze swept across the parking lot. [I always + adv/prep] He would sweep through the room shaking hands with everyone. [T] Our headlights were sweeping the trees ahead.

sweep verb (WIN)

[T] to win all the parts of a competition: New York swept their series with Vancouver, 3-0.

sweepnoun [C]

 us   /swip/

sweep noun [C] (MOVEMENT)

a large movement across an area: the sweep of the clock’s hour hand a police sweep The sweep of an idea or piece of writing is the range of its subject: He is aware of the epic sweep of this project.

sweep noun [C] (WIN)

the fact of winning everything that is available or all parts of a competition: She prevented Republicans from making a clean sweep of the election by winning the race in District 27.
(Definition of sweep from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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