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English definition of “swing”

swing

verb  /swɪŋ/ (past tense and past participle swung  /swʌŋ/) us  

swing verb (MOVE SIDEWAYS)

[I/T] to move easily to one direction and then to the other from a fixed point, or to cause something to move this way: [I] He hung upside down and swung back and forth. [I] The heavy door swung open. [T] Campanella knew how to swing a bat. [T] He swung the car into the garage.

swing verb (CHANGE)

[I] to change from one condition or attitude to another: The company swung from record profits last year to huge losses this year.

swing verb (BE EXCITING)

[I] dated slang to be exciting, enjoyable, and active

swing verb (ARRANGE)

[T] infml to arrange to obtain or achieve something: The kids need new clothes, and I don’t see how I can swing it.

swing

noun  /swɪŋ/ us  

swing noun (MUSIC)

[U] a form of jazz music that was popular esp. in the 1930s and 1940s

swing noun (CHANGE)

[C] a usually sudden change: He’s very creative but prone to mood swings.

swing noun (SIDEWAYS MOVEMENT)

[C] a swinging movement: Scott took a big swing at the ball and missed. [C] A swing is also an attempt to hit someone: This guy took a swing at me. [C] A swing is also a seat that moves backward and forward and hangs from ropes or chains. [C] A swing can also be a brief trip: Ed took a 10-day swing through France.
(Definition of swing from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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