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English definition of “tight”

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tight

adjective, adverb [-er/-est only]  /tɑɪt/ us  

tight adjective, adverb [-er/-est only] (FIRMLY TOGETHER)

(held or kept together) firmly or closely: You have to wrap the bandage tight enough so that it really supports your ankle. Make sure the door is shut tight (= completely closed) before you leave. Clothes that are tight fit the body closely, sometimes so closely that they are uncomfortable: She wore a tight black skirt. These shoes feel a bit tight. If you say about two people that they are tight, you mean they are close friends.

tight

adjective  /tɑɪt/ us  

tight adjective (LIMITED)

[-er/-est only] (esp. of time or money) available in limited amounts: Arnold has a very tight schedule today and I don’t know if he can see you. We’re on a tight budget and can’t afford to eat out much. Parking is very tight on weekdays around here.

tight adjective (CONTROLLED)

strongly controlled: Security was tight at the meeting between the two leaders.

tight adjective (DIFFICULT)

(of situations) difficult or hard to deal with: We were in a tight financial situation. I was in a tight spot (= difficult situation) and wasn’t sure what I should do. In a competition, tight means close, with the competitors almost even: He was involved in a very tight race for governor.
(Definition of tight from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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