Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “touch”

See all translations

touch

verb  /tʌtʃ/ us  

touch verb (USE FINGERS)

[I/T] to put the fingers or hand lightly on or against something: [I] That paint is wet, so don’t touch. [I/T] infml If you cannot touch something, you are not allowed to have or use it: [T] She can’t touch the money from her father until she’s 21. [I/T] infml If you say you do not touch something, you mean that you do not drink or eat it: [T] I never touch candy.

touch verb (BE CLOSE)

[I/T] to be so close together that there is no space between: [T] Don’t let the back of the chair touch the wall. [I] Push the bookcases together until they touch. [I/T] If one thing does not touch something similar, it is not as good as the other thing: [T] Her cooking can’t touch her sister’s.

touch verb (CAUSE FEELINGS)

[T] to cause someone to feel sympathetic or grateful: Your kindness has touched my family.

touch

noun  /tʌtʃ/ us  

touch noun (SKILL)

[U] a skill or special quality: He seems to be losing his touch at poker. The flowers were a nice touch.

touch noun (SMALL AMOUNT)

[C] a small amount: There was a touch of regret in her voice. I had a touch of flu yesterday.

touch noun (BEING CLOSE)

[U] the state of being close together or in contact with someone or something

touch noun (FEELING WITH FINGERS )

[C/U] the ability to know what something is like by putting your hand or fingers on it: [U] This cloth is soft to the touch. [C/U] A touch is an act of putting your hand or fingers briefly on something to operate it: [C] At a touch of the button, the door opened.
(Definition of touch from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of touch?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “touch” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

work out

to exercise in order to improve the strength or appearance of your body

Word of the Day

Byronic, Orwellian and Darwinian: adjectives from names.

by Liz Walter,
April 15, 2015
Becoming an adjective is a strange kind of memorial, but it is often a sign of a person having had real influence on the world. Science is full of examples, from Hippocrates, the Greek medic born around 460 BC, who gave his name to the Hippocratic Oath still used by doctors today,

Read More 

bio-inspiration noun

April 13, 2015
the adoption of patterns and structures found in nature for the purposes of engineering, manufacturing, science, etc. The MIT researchers actually aren’t the only robotics team to turn to cheetahs for bio-inspiration.

Read More