touch - definition in the American English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “touch”

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touch

verb  us   /tʌtʃ/

touch verb (USE FINGERS)

[I/T] to put the fingers or hand lightly on or against something: [I] That paint is wet, so don’t touch. [I/T] infml If you cannot touch something, you are not allowed to have or use it: [T] She can’t touch the money from her father until she’s 21. [I/T] infml If you say you do not touch something, you mean that you do not drink or eat it: [T] I never touch candy.

touch verb (BE CLOSE)

[I/T] to be so close together that there is no space between: [T] Don’t let the back of the chair touch the wall. [I] Push the bookcases together until they touch. [I/T] If one thing does not touch something similar, it is not as good as the other thing: [T] Her cooking can’t touch her sister’s.

touch verb (CAUSE FEELINGS)

[T] to cause someone to feel sympathetic or grateful: Your kindness has touched my family.

touch

noun  us   /tʌtʃ/

touch noun (SKILL)

[U] a skill or special quality: He seems to be losing his touch at poker. The flowers were a nice touch.

touch noun (SMALL AMOUNT)

[C] a small amount: There was a touch of regret in her voice. I had a touch of flu yesterday.

touch noun (BEING CLOSE)

[U] the state of being close together or in contact with someone or something

touch noun (FEELING WITH FINGERS )

[C/U] the ability to know what something is like by putting your hand or fingers on it: [U] This cloth is soft to the touch. [C/U] A touch is an act of putting your hand or fingers briefly on something to operate it: [C] At a touch of the button, the door opened.
(Definition of touch from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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