track - definition in the American English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “track”

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track

noun  us   /træk/

track noun (PATH)

[C] a path that is narrower than a road, often with an uneven surface: We walked along a muddy track at the side of the field. [C] A track is also one or a pair of parallel metal bars on which trains travel.

track noun (MARKS)

[C usually pl] a mark or line of marks left on a surface, esp. the ground, by a moving animal, person, or vehicle, that shows the direction of travel: deer tracks in the snow

track noun (SPORTS)

[C/U] the sport of competitive running, or a wide, circular path that is made for this sport: [U] Fall sports include football, hockey, and track. [C/U] A track is also a specially prepared surface for any kind of racing: [C] a dog/thoroughbred track

track noun (MUSIC)

[C] one of several songs or pieces of music on a musical recording

track

verb [T]  us   /træk/

track verb [T] (MAKE MARKS)

to follow something that moves or changes by noticing marks or signs that it has left behind: The study tracked the careers of 1226 doctors who trained at Harvard Medical School. If you track something messy or dirty, you leave messy or dirty marks when walking because you had something on your shoes or feet: The kids are always tracking mud in the kitchen.
(Definition of track from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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