trickle - definition in the American English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “trickle”

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trickle

verb [I]  us   /ˈtrɪk·əl/
(of liquid) to flow slowly and without force: Blood trickled from a cut in his forehead. To trickle is also to happen gradually and in small numbers: After the hurricane, all the telephones were out, and it was some time before reports of damage began to trickle in.

trickle

noun [C]  us   /ˈtrɪk·əl/
a slow flow of something, or a small number of people or things arriving or leaving somewhere: A trickle of sweat ran down his chest. Only a trickle (= small amount) of goods reached the village.
Translations of “trickle”
in Arabic يَقْطُر…
in Korean 흐르다…
in Malaysian menitis…
in French dégoutter…
in Italian colare, gocciolare…
in Chinese (Traditional) 液體…
in Vietnamese chảy chậm, chảy nhỏ…
in Spanish gotear, resbalar un hilo de (sangre/agua), salir poco a poco…
in Portuguese escorrer…
in Thai ไหลเป็นหยด…
in German tröpfeln…
in Catalan degotar, regalimar…
in Japanese (液体が)伝う, したたる…
in Indonesian menitik…
in Chinese (Simplified) 液体…
(Definition of trickle from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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