water Meaning in Cambridge American English Dictionary
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Meaning of "water" - American English Dictionary

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waternoun [U]

 us   /ˈwɔ·t̬ər, ˈwɑt̬·ər/
a clear, colorless liquid that falls from the sky as rain and is necessary for animal and plant life: a drink/glass of water bottled/tap water cold/hot water I’m boiling water to make some more coffee. The water often refers to an area of water, such as the sea or a lake: The water’s much warmer today – are you coming for a swim? Waters is an area of natural water, such as a part of the sea: [pl] coastal waters

waterverb [I/T]

 us   /ˈwɔ·t̬ər, ˈwɑt̬·ər/
to provide water to a plant or animal: [T] I’ve asked my neighbor to water the plants while I’m away. When your eyes water, they produce tears but not because you are unhappy: [I] The icy wind made his eyes water. If your mouth waters, it produces a lot of saliva , usually because you can see or smell food that you would like to eat: [I] The smell of that bread is making my mouth water.
Phrasal verbs
Translations of “water”
in Arabic ماء…
in Korean 물…
in Malaysian terliur, kecur, berair…
in French saliver, pleurer…
in Turkish su, deniz, nehir…
in Italian acqua…
in Chinese (Traditional) 水, 水域, 大片的水…
in Russian вода…
in Polish woda…
in Vietnamese chảy nước bọt, làm chảy nước mắt…
in Spanish hacerse la boca agua, llorar…
in Portuguese água…
in Thai น้ำลายไหล, น้ำตาไหล…
in German wässern, tränen…
in Catalan aigua…
in Japanese 水…
in Indonesian mengeluarkan liur, mengeluarkan air mata…
in Chinese (Simplified) 水, 水域, 大片的水…
(Definition of water from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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