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English definition of “wave”

wave

verb [I/T]  /weɪv/ us  

wave verb [I/T] (MOVE)

to raise your hand and move it from side to side as a greeting, or to get someone's attention or give information: [I] She leaned out the window and waved (good-bye). [M] As soon as we showed our papers as journalists, the policeman waved us in (= moved his hand to allow us to go in). If you wave something or something waves, you move it from side to side while holding it in the hand, or something else moves it in this way: [T] He was very excited and rushed into the room waving a piece of paper. [I] Flags waved in the breeze.

wave

noun [C]  /weɪv/ us  

wave noun [C] (WATER MOVEMENT)

a raised movement of water rolling across the surface esp. of the sea: We were so close we could hear the waves breaking on the beach. A wave is also a sudden increase in an activity or in the strength of a condition or feeling: A wave of emotion swept through her as she visited her home town.

wave noun [C] (ENERGY FORM)

physics the continuous, repeating pattern in which some types of energy, such as sound, light, and heat, are spread or carried: electromagnetic waves

wave noun [C] (MOVE)

a movement of your raised hand from side to side or up and down as a greeting or goodbye, or to get someone's attention or give information: She looked at him for a long time, and then, with a wave of her hand, she was off.
(Definition of wave from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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