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English definition of “way”

way

noun  /weɪ/ us  

way noun (ROUTE)

[C] a route or path to follow in order to get to a place: Do you know the way to the train station? [C] If you don’t know your way, can’t find your way, or have lost your way, you are not sure or do not know how to get where you want to go: I don’t really know my way around town yet. [C] Way also means street: Our office is at 17 Harbor Way. [C] Way can mean the direction, position, or order of something: The numbers should be the other way around – 71, not 17. [C] Your way can also be the progress of your life: He made his way from sales assistant to head of sales.

way noun (DISTANCE)

[U] (also ways,  /weɪz/) distance, or a period of time: We walked just a short way before he got tired. When Mom called us for supper, we were still a ways from being finished.

way noun (MANNER)

[C] a particular manner, characteristic, or fashion: I like the way your hair is fixed. Jack and Beth feel the same way about animals. There is no way I can leave her. They don’t write songs the way they used to. [C] Your way is also the ability to do things in the manner you want: My little sister gets furious if she doesn’t get her way.

way

adverb [always + adv/prep; not gradable]  /weɪ/ infml us  

way adverb [always + adv/prep; not gradable] (FAR)

(used for emphasis) far or long: That skirt’s way too much money. Come on now, Alexander, it’s way past your bedtime. slang Way can also mean very: That car is way cool!
(Definition of way from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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