whip - definition in the American English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “whip”

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whip

noun [C]  us   /hwɪp, wɪp/

whip noun [C] (STRAP)

a piece of leather or rope fastened to a stick, used to train and control animals or, esp. in the past, to hit people: The trainer cracked his whip, and the lions sat in a circle.

whip noun [C] (POLITICS)

an elected representative of a political party in a legislature whose job is to gather support from other legislators (= law makers) for particular legislation and to encourage them to vote the way their party wants them to

whip

verb  us   /hwɪp, wɪp/ (-pp-)

whip verb (MOVE QUICKLY)

[always + adv/prep] to bring or take (something) quickly, or to move quickly: [M] They whipped my plate away before I’d even finished. [M] Bill whipped out his harmonica. [I] The wind whipped around the corner of the building.

whip verb (BEAT FOOD)

[T] to beat cream, eggs, potatoes, etc., with a special utensil in order to make it thick and soft: I still need to whip the cream for the pie.

whip verb (STRAP)

[T] to hit a person with a whip, esp. for punishment, or to hit an animal with a whip in order to control it or make it move more quickly: To train them, owners often whip their pit bulls. fig. Dallas whipped Buffalo 52 to 17 (= beat them by this score).
(Definition of whip from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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