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English definition of “witness”

witness

noun  /ˈwɪt·nəs/ us  

witness noun (PERSON WHO SEES)

[C/U] a person who sees an event happening, esp. a crime or an accident: [C] According to witnesses, the car used in the robbery was a green van with Pennsylvania license plates. [C/U] Someone who is witness to something sees it: [U] She was witness to the tragic event. [C/U] If you are a witness, you are asked to be present at a particular event and to sign (= write your name on) a document in order to prove that things have been done correctly: [C] The will has to be signed by two witnesses.

witness noun (PERSON IN COURT)

[C] a person in a law court who promises to tell the truth and answers questions about something that was seen or is known: defense/prosecution witnesses Five witnesses are expected to testify at the trial today.

witness

verb [T]  /ˈwɪt·nəs/ us  

witness verb [T] (BE THE PERSON WHO SEES)

to see something happen: We were there at the time and witnessed the accident. The university has witnessed (= experienced) quite a few changes over the years. Witness also means to show or give proof of something: The program aroused strong feelings, as witnessed by the number of letters the station received. Rock music is becoming a health problem – witness the loss of hearing (= for proof, look at the loss of hearing) in some of our youth. If you are asked to witness an event, you are asked to be present at it and sign your name to prove that things have been done correctly.
(Definition of witness from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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