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English definition of “worth”

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worth

noun [U]  /wɜrθ/ us  

worth noun [U] (MONEY)

the amount of money that something can be sold for: The estimated worth of her jewels alone is about $30 million. A particular amount of money’s worth of something is the amount of money that it costs: $20 worth of gasoline

worth noun [U] (IMPORTANCE)

the importance or usefulness of something or someone: a sense of personal worth Some people are modest to the point of not realizing their true worth.

worth noun [U] (AMOUNT)

an amount of something that will last a stated period of time or that takes a stated amount of time to do: We got a week’s worth of diapers at the supermarket. When the computer crashed, we lost six month’s worth of work.

worth

adjective [not gradable]  /wɜrθ/ us  

worth adjective [not gradable] (IMPORTANCE)

important or useful enough to have or do: There are only two things worth reading in this newspaper – the TV listings and the sports page. I don’t think it’s worth talking about any more.

worth adjective [not gradable] (MONEY)

having a value in money of: They’re asking $10,000 for the car, but I don’t think it’s worth that much. It is an expensive restaurant, but for special occasions it’s worth it (= the value of what you get is equal to the money spent). If a person is worth a particular amount of money, the person has that amount or owns things that would cost that amount: She must be worth at least half a million.
Translations of “worth”
in Spanish valor…
in French valeur…
in German der Wert…
in Chinese (Simplified) 钱, 值…钱的, 拥有…财产的…
in Chinese (Traditional) 錢, 值…錢的, 擁有…財產的…
(Definition of worth from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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