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English definition of “wrong”

wrong

adjective  /rɔŋ/ us  

wrong adjective (NOT CORRECT)

not correct or not accurate: Three of your answers were wrong. That clock is wrong – it’s 12:30, not 12:15. I dialed the wrong number.

wrong adjective (NOT SUITABLE)

not suitable or desirable, or not as it should be: It was the wrong time to ask for a raise. She was just the wrong person for the job.

wrong adjective (IMMORAL)

[not gradable] not morally acceptable: He believes that censorship is wrong.

wrong adjective (NOT WORKING)

[not gradable] not working correctly: Something’s wrong with the dishwasher – it’s leaking again.
wrong
adverb [not gradable]  /rɔŋ/ us  
It doesn’t work – what am I doing wrong?

wrong

verb [T]  /rɔŋ/ us  

wrong verb [T] (TREAT UNFAIRLY)

to treat someone in an unfair or unacceptable way: He felt he had been wronged, but everyone else blamed him for what happened. To wrong someone is also to judge someone unfairly and express uncertainty about that person’s character: That reporter wronged her, saying she was an unfit mother.

wrong

noun  /rɔŋ/ us  

wrong noun (IMMORAL ACT)

[C/U] behavior or an act that is morally unacceptable; evil or an evil act: [U] She has a keen sense of right and wrong. [C] It’s impossible to exaggerate the wrongs caused by slavery.

wrong noun (ACT THAT IS NOT CORRECT)

behavior or an act that is not correct: If there's been a wrong, physicians (= doctors) want it made right.
(Definition of wrong from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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