abandon definition, meaning - what is abandon in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “abandon”

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abandon

verb [T] uk   us   /əˈbæn.dən/

abandon verb [T] (LEAVE)

B2 to leave a place, thing, or person, usually for ever: We had to abandon the car. By the time the rebel troops arrived, the village had already been abandoned. As a baby he was abandoned by his mother. We were sinking fast, and the captain gave the order to abandon ship.
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abandon verb [T] (STOP)

C1 to stop doing an activity before you have finished it: The game was abandoned at half-time because of the poor weather conditions. They had to abandon their attempt to climb the mountain. The party has now abandoned its policy of unilateral disarmament.
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abandon yourself to sth to allow yourself to be controlled completely by a feeling or way of living: He abandoned himself to his emotions.
abandoned
adjective uk   us   /əˈbæn.dənd/
B2 An abandoned baby was found in a box on the hospital steps.
abandonment
noun [U] uk   us   /-mənt/
The abandonment of the island followed nuclear tests in the area.

abandon

noun uk   us   /əˈbæn.dən/ literary
with (gay/wild) abandon in a completely uncontrolled way: We danced with wild abandon.
(Definition of abandon from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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