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English definition of “above”

above

adverb, preposition uk   /əˈbʌv/ us  

above adverb, preposition (HIGHER POSITION)

A1 in or to a higher position than something else: There's a mirror above the washbasin. He waved the letter excitedly above his head. She's rented a room above a shop. Her name comes above mine on the list. The helicopter was hovering above the building. It's on the shelf just above your head. A crack had started to appear just above the light fitting.

above adverb, preposition (MORE)

A2 more than an amount or level: It says on the box it's for children aged three and above. Rates of pay are above average. Temperatures rarely rise above zero in winter. She values her job above her family. They value their freedom above (and beyond) all else. above all B1 most importantly: Above all, I'd like to thank my family. Above all, I'd say I value kindness.

above adverb, preposition (RANK)

in a more important or advanced position than someone else: Sally's a grade above me.

above adverb, preposition (TOO IMPORTANT)

C2 too good or important for something: No one is above suspicion in this matter. He's not above lying (= he sometimes lies) to protect himself.

above

adverb, adjective uk   /əˈbʌv/ us  

above adverb, adjective (ON PAGE)

B1 When used in a piece of writing, 'above' means higher on the page, or on a previous page: Please send the articles to the address given above. The letter was sent to the above address. the above all the people or things listed earlier: All of the above should be invited. Once we've finished all of the above we can start on the next project.
(Definition of above from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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