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English definition of “adapt”

adapt

verb uk   /əˈdæpt/ us  

adapt verb (CHANGE)

B2 [T] to change something to suit different conditions or uses: Many software companies have adapted popular programs to the new operating system. The recipe here is a pork roast adapted from Caroline O'Neill's book "Louisiana Kitchen". [+ to infinitive] We had to adapt our plans to fit Jack's timetable. The play had been adapted for (= changed to make it suitable for) children. Davies is busy adapting Brinkworth's latest novel for television.

adapt verb (BECOME FAMILIAR)

B2 [I] to become familiar with a new situation: The good thing about children is that they adapt very easily to new environments. It took me a while to adapt to the new job.
adapted
adjective uk   /əˈdæp.tɪd/ us  
Both trees are well adapted to London's dry climate and dirty air.
(Definition of adapt from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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