Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “angle”

See all translations

angle

noun [C] uk   /ˈæŋ.ɡl̩/ us  

angle noun [C] (SPACE BETWEEN LINES)

C1 the space between two lines or surfaces at the point at which they touch each other, measured in degrees: The interior angles of a square are right angles or angles of 90 degrees. The boat settled into the mud at a 35° angle/at an angle of 35°.at an angle C1 not horizontal or vertical, but sloping in one direction: The picture was hanging at an angle. He wore his hat at a jaunty angle. the corner of a building, table, or anything with straight sides
More examples

angle noun [C] (POSITION)

C1 a position from which something is looked at: The tower is visible from every angle/all angles. I realized I was looking at it from the wrong angle.

angle noun [C] (WAY OF THINKING)

C1 a way of considering, judging, or dealing with something: Try looking at the problem from another angle/from my angle. The press was looking for a new/fresh angle on the situation.

angle

verb [T] uk   /ˈæŋ.ɡl̩/ us  

angle verb [T] (SLOPE)

to aim, turn, or position something in a direction that is not horizontal or vertical: The stage had been steeply angled (= was sloping very noticeably).

angle verb [T] (DIRECT)

to direct information at a particular group of people: The magazine is angled at the 20 to 35-year-old women's market.
angled
adjective uk   /ˈæŋ.ɡl̩d/ us  
His angled shot (= from the side, not from straight in front) beat the goalkeeper from 20 yards.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of angle from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of angle?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “angle” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

comma

the symbol , used in writing to separate parts of a sentence showing a slight pause, or to separate the single things in a list

Word of the Day

Lies, lies, lies!

by Kate Woodford,
February 25, 2015
​​​ According to sociologists (=people who study the relationships between people living in groups), we are good at lying. As a species, we have developed a remarkable ability to deceive each other (= persuade each other that something false is true). Being able to say things that are not true can help with

Read More 

showrooming noun

February 23, 2015
the activity of examining a product in a physical store and then making the purchase with an online retailer Amazon’s new smartphone is specifically designed to make showrooming fast and easy.

Read More