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English definition of “any”

any

determiner, pronoun uk   /ˈen.i/ us  

any determiner, pronoun (SOME)

A1 some, or even the smallest amount or number of: Is there any of that lemon cake left? There was hardly any food left by the time we got there. "Is there some butter I could use?" "No, there's some margarine but there isn't any butter." "Is there any more soup?" "No, I'm afraid there isn't any left." I haven't seen any of his films. I don't expect we'll have any more trouble from him. I go to church for weddings but not for any other reason. Are you sure there isn't any way of solving this problem?

any determiner, pronoun (NOT IMPORTANT WHICH)

A1 one of or each of a particular type of person or thing when it is not important which: Any food would be better than nothing at all. "Which of these cakes may I eat?" "Any." The offer was that you could have any three items of clothing you liked for £30.informal On Sundays I just wear any old thing (= anything) that I happen to find lying around. Any of you should be able to answer this question. Any idiot with a basic knowledge of French should be able to book a hotel room in Paris. Any advice (= whatever advice) that you can give me would be greatly appreciated. Any minute/day/time now (= very soon) there's going to be a massive quarrel between those two. There were a lot of computers at the exhibition, any (one) of which would have suited me perfectly.

any

(Definition of any from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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