anywhere definition, meaning - what is anywhere in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “anywhere”

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anywhere

adverb, pronoun uk   /ˈen.i.weər/  us   /-wer/ (US also anyplace)
A2 in, to, or at any place: You won't find a better plumber anywhere in England. Go anywhere in the world and you'll find some sort of hamburger restaurant. I was wondering if there was anywhere I could go to get this repaired. There are quite a few words that they use in that part of the country that you don't hear anywhere else. They live in some tiny little village miles from anywhere (= a very long way from any towns).A2 used in questions or negatives to mean "a place": I can't find my keys anywhere. Is there anywhere in particular you wanted to go to eat tonight? Did you go anywhere interesting this summer? Is there anywhere to eat around here? used to say that a number or amount is in a certain range but that you cannot say exactly what it is: He charges anywhere from $20 to $50 for a haircut. As a teacher you could expect to be paid anywhere (= any amount) between £25 and £50 per hour.
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(Definition of anywhere from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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