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English definition of “application”

application

noun uk   /ˌæp.lɪˈkeɪ.ʃən/ us  

application noun (REQUEST)

B1 [C or U] an official request for something, usually in writing: a letter of application Free information will be sent out on application to (= if you ask) the central office. I've sent off applications for four different jobs. Have you filled in the application form for your passport yet? [+ to infinitive] Argentina has submitted an application to host the World Cup.

application noun (COMPUTER)

B2 [C] a computer program that is designed for a particular purpose: spreadsheet applications

application noun (USE)

C2 [C or U] a way in which something can be used for a particular purpose: The design has many applications. the application of this research in the treatment of cancer

application noun (HARD WORK)

[U] the determination to work hard over a period of time in order to succeed at something: Joshua clearly has ability in this subject but lacks application.

application noun (PUTTING ON)

[C or U] the act of spreading or rubbing a substance such as cream or paint on a surface, or a layer of cream or paint: Leave the paint to dry between applications. Regular application of the cream should reduce swelling within 24 hours.

application noun (RELATION TO)

[C or U] a way in which a rule or law, etc. relates to or is important for someone or something: The new laws have (a) particular application to the self-employed.
(Definition of application from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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