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English definition of “arch”

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arch

noun [C] uk   /ɑːtʃ/ us    /ɑːrtʃ/

arch noun [C] (CURVED STRUCTURE)

C2 a structure, consisting of a curved top on two supports, that holds the weight of something above it: In many churches the side aisles are separated from the central aisle by a row of arches. Passing through the arch, you enter an open courtyard. The vines were trained over an arch, providing shade as well as fruit. The temple's grand white arches rose conspicuously over the dirty decaying city. The abbey is known for its majestic arches, fine doorways and elegant windows. The town is dominated by the massive arches of a viaduct.
See also

arch noun [C] (SHAPE)

something that has the shape of an arch, often used for decoration: The boat floated through the arch of the trees towards the bridge.

arch noun [C] (FOOT)

the raised curve on the bottom of your foot: She has very high arches.

arch noun [C] (BODY)

specialized medical any organ or part of the body that is curved in shape: The premature loss of primary teeth causes shrinking of the dental arch.

arch

verb [I or T] uk   /ɑːtʃ/ us    /ɑːrtʃ/
C2 to make the shape of an arch: Trees arch over the river. Her eyebrows arched in contempt. She watched the cat arch its back.

arch

adjective uk   /ɑːtʃ/ us    /ɑːrtʃ/
showing that you think it is amusing that you know more about something than someone else does: an arch tone of voice
archly
adverb uk   /ˈɑːtʃli/ us    /ˈɑːrtʃli/
She smiled archly at him. "I fail to understand what you're suggesting," said Claire archly.
(Definition of arch noun, verb, adjective from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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