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English definition of “art”

art

noun uk   /ɑːt/ us    /ɑːrt/

art noun (EXPRESSION)

A2 [U] the making of objects, images, music, etc. that are beautiful or that express feelings: Can television and pop music really be considered art? I enjoyed the ballet, but it wasn't really great art. A2 [U] the activity of painting, drawing, and making sculpture: Art and English were my best subjects at school. an art teacher A2 [U] paintings, drawings, and sculptures: The gallery has an excellent collection of modern art. an exhibition of Native American art Peggy Guggenheim was one of the 20th century's great art collectors. The Frick is an art gallery in New York. B2 [C] an activity through which people express particular ideas: Drama is an art that is traditionally performed in a theatre. Do you regard film as entertainment or as an art? She is doing a course in the performing arts. the arts the making or showing or performance of painting, acting, dancing, and music: More government money is needed for the arts. public interest in the arts

art noun (NOT SCIENCE)

arts C1 [plural] subjects, such as history, languages, and literature, that are not scientific subjects: At school I was quite good at arts, but hopeless at science. Children should be given a well-balanced education in both the arts and the sciences. arts graduates/degrees

art noun (SKILL)

C1 [C] a skill or special ability: the art of conversation Getting him to go out is quite an art (= needs special skill).

art

verb /ɑːt/ us  /ɑːrt/ old use
in the past, the second person singular of the present tense of "be": thou art (= you are)
(Definition of art from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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