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English definition of “attention”

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attention

noun [U] uk   /əˈten.ʃən/ us  

attention noun [U] (NOTICE)

B1 notice, thought, or interest: Ladies and gentlemen, could I have your attention, please? They're organizing a campaign to draw people's attention to the environmentally harmful effects of using their cars. Wait a moment and I'll give you my full/undivided attention (= I'll listen to and think about only you). After an hour, my attention started to wander (= I stopped taking notice).get/attract/catch sb's attention B2 to make someone notice you: I knocked on the window to get her attention.pay attention (to sth/sb) B1 to watch, listen to, or think about something or someone carefully or with interest: If you don't pay attention now, you'll get it all wrong later. Don't pay any attention to Nina - she doesn't know what she's talking about. He wasn't paying attention to the safety instructions.the centre of attention the thing or person that a lot of people notice: He likes telling jokes and being the centre of attention at parties.turn your attention(s) to sth/sb to start to think about or consider a particular thing or person: Many countries are starting to turn their attention to new forms of energy.
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attention noun [U] (CARE)

special care or treatment: The paintwork will need a little attention. If symptoms persist, seek medical attention.

attention noun [U] (WAY OF STANDING)

(especially in the armed forces) a way of standing, with the feet together, arms by your sides, head up, and shoulders back, and not moving: soldiers standing at/to attention
(Definition of attention from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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