bar definition, meaning - what is bar in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “bar”

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bar

noun [C] uk   /bɑːr/  us   /bɑːr/

bar noun [C] (DRINKING PLACE)

A1 a place where drinks, especially alcoholic drinks, are sold and drunk, or the area in such a place where the person serving the drinks stands: They noticed him going into the hotel bar. There weren't any free tables, so I sat at the bar. Why don't you ask the guy behind the bar (= serving drinks there)?
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bar noun [C] (LONG PIECE)

B2 a long, thin, straight piece of metal or wood: The gorilla rattled the bars of its cage.B1 a substance that has been made into a solid rectangular shape: a bar of soap a chocolate bar UK The bar of an electric heater is a long, thin wire in the shape of a spring that is wrapped tightly around a tube. When electricity passes through it, it produces heat and red light.
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bar noun [C] (MUSIC)

(US also measure) one of the small equal parts into which a piece of music is divided, containing a fixed number of beats: Waltzes have three beats in/to the bar (= in each bar). US (UK bar line) a vertical line that divides one bar from another in a written piece of music

bar noun [C] (ON UNIFORM)

US a stripe

bar noun [C] (PREVENTING)

C2 [C usually singular] something that prevents a particular event or development from happening: A lack of formal education is no bar to becoming rich.

bar

verb [T] uk   /bɑːr/  us   /bɑːr/ (-rr-)

bar verb [T] (PREVENT)

to prevent something or someone from doing something or going somewhere, or to not allow something: The centre of the town was barred to football supporters. The incident led to him being barred from the country/barred from entering the country. I tried to push past her but she barred my way/path (= stood in front of me and prevented me from getting past).

bar verb [T] (CLOSE)

to put bars across something, especially to keep it closed: We barred the door to stop anyone getting into the room.

bar

preposition uk   /bɑːr/  us   /bɑːr/ formal
except: Everyone is leaving the village, bar the very old and ill. They're the best songwriters of this century, bar none (= no one else is better).
(Definition of bar from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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