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English definition of “benefit”

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benefit

noun uk   /ˈben.ɪ.fɪt/ us  

benefit noun (ADVANTAGE)

B1 [C or U] a helpful or good effect, or something intended to help: The discovery of oil brought many benefits to the town. One of the many benefits of foreign travel is learning how to cope with the unexpected. He's had the benefit of an expensive education and yet he continues to work as a waiter. I didn't get/derive (much) benefit from school. With the benefit of hindsight (= helped by the knowledge learned later) it is easy for us to see where we went wrong. formal She drinks a lot less now, to the benefit of her health as a whole. [C, usually plural] an advantage such as medical insurance, life insurance, and sick pay, that employees receive from their employer in addition to money: In addition to my salary, I get a pension and medical benefits.
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benefit noun (MONEY FROM GOVERNMENT)

[C or U] UK ( US usually benefits) the money given by the government to people who need financial help, for example because they cannot find a job: unemployment benefit I'm on benefit at the moment. If they could not prove they were looking for work, they could lose their benefit. We can help you find out if you qualify for any benefits.

benefit noun (EVENT)

[C] an event such as a concert, performance, etc. that is organized in order to raise money for people in need: benefit concert

benefit

verb [I or T] uk   /ˈben.ɪ.fɪt/ (-t- or -tt-) us  
B2 to be helped by something or to help someone: I feel that I have benefited greatly from her wisdom. How can we benefit those who most need our help?
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(Definition of benefit from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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