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English definition of “beyond”

beyond

preposition, adverb uk   /biˈjɒnd/ us    /-ˈjɑːnd/

beyond preposition, adverb (FURTHER AWAY)

B1 further away in the distance (than something): In the distance, beyond the river, was a small town. From the top of the hill we could see our house and the woods beyond.

beyond preposition, adverb (OUTSIDE A LIMIT)

B1 outside or after (a stated limit): Few people live beyond the age of a hundred. We cannot allow the work to continue beyond the end of the year. I've got nothing to tell you beyond (= in addition to) what I told you earlier. The repercussions will be felt throughout the industry and beyond (= in other areas). Tonight's performance has been cancelled due to circumstances beyond our control (= events that we are unable to deal with). She has always lived beyond her means (= spent more than she has earned). beyond belief, repair, recognition, etc. C2 too great or bad for anyone to believe, repair, recognize, etc.: His thoughtlessness is beyond belief. He survived the accident, but his car was damaged beyond repair. beyond reasonable doubt UK (US beyond a reasonable doubt) If a legal case or a person's guilt is proved beyond reasonable doubt, there is enough proof for the person accused of a crime to be judged guilty: Her guilt was established beyond reasonable doubt.

beyond preposition, adverb (NOT UNDERSTAND)

be beyond sb C1 informal If something is beyond you, you are unable to understand it: I'm afraid physics is completely beyond me.
(Definition of beyond from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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