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English definition of “bid”

bid

verb uk   /bɪd/ us  

bid verb (OFFER)

C2 [I or T] (present participle bidding, past tense bid, past participle bid) to offer a particular amount of money for something that is for sale and compete against other people to buy it, especially at a public sale of goods or property: She knew she couldn't afford it, so she didn't bid. The communications group has shown an interest in bidding for the company. A foreign collector has bid £500,000 for the portrait. [+ two objects] What am I bid for this fine vase? [I] (present participle bidding, past tense bid, past participle bid) If two or more people bid for a job, they compete with each other to do the work by offering to do it for a particular amount of money: The department is trying to ensure fairer competition among firms bidding for government contracts. [T + to infinitive] (present participle bidding, past tense bid, past participle bid) If someone bids to do something, they compete with other people to do it: Paris is bidding to host the next Olympics. [I or T] (present participle bidding, past tense bid, past participle bid) (in some card games) to say, before play starts, how many points you expect to win in a particular game: Before you decide how to bid, you need to evaluate how strong the hand of cards you are holding is. She bid three diamonds.

bid verb (TELL)

[T] (present participle bidding, past tense bid or bade, past participle bidden) old-fashioned to give a greeting to someone, or to ask someone to do something: [+ two objects] They bade her good morning. I must now bid you farewell (= say goodbye to you).literary She bade her hopes farewell (= she stopped being hopeful). [+ object + (to) infinitive ] He bade (= asked) them (to) leave at once.

bid

noun [C] uk   /bɪd/ us  

bid noun [C] (OFFER)

C2 an offer of a particular amount of money for something that is for sale: I made a bid of $150 for the painting. She made/put in a bid of £69,000 for the flat, which was accepted. C1 an offer to do something when you are competing with other people to do it: [+ to infinitive] Sydney made a successful bid to host the Olympic Games. I gave the job to the contractors who made/gave the lowest bid (= who offered to do the work for the lowest amount of money). (in some card games) a statement, made before play starts, of how many points a player thinks he or she will get in a particular game : The declarer must make as many tricks as his bid has promised.

bid noun [C] (ATTEMPT)

C2 an attempt to achieve or get something: Her bid for re-election was unsuccessful. The company has managed to fight off a hostile takeover bid (= an attempt by another company to take control of it). The government has reduced the cost of borrowing in a bid to get the economy moving again.
(Definition of bid from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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