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English definition of “bind”

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bind

verb uk   /baɪnd/ (bound, bound) us  
C2 [T] to tie something tightly or to fasten something: They bound the packages with brightly coloured ribbon. Bind together the two broken ends. The prisoner was bound hand and foot.C2 [T] to unite people: The things that bind them together are greater than their differences. [T] ( also bind up) To bind a part of the body, especially a part that is damaged, is to tie something around it: He had already bound the child's arm when I arrived. [T] to sew or stick material along the edges of something such as a jacket, in order to make it stronger or to decorate it [T] to make separate pieces of paper into a book: There are several different ways to bind a book, for example you can stitch or stick the pages together.
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[I or T] When an egg or water is used, especially in cooking, to bind something, it provides a way of making everything stick together in a solid mass: The mixture wouldn't bind (together).
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Phrasal verbs

bind

noun [S] uk   /baɪnd/ informal us  
a difficult or annoying situation in which you are prevented from acting as you might like: Having to visit her every week is a terrible bind. Borrowing money may put you in a real bind.
(Definition of bind from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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