Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “blast”

blast

verb uk   /blɑːst/ us    /blæst/

blast verb (EXPLODE)

[I or T] to explode or destroy something or someone with explosives, or to break through or hit something with a similar, very strong force: A tunnel was to be blasted through the mountains. They heard the guns blasting away all night.figurative Their latest album blasted (its way) up the charts (= moved very quickly because of its popularity).
See also

blast verb (NOISE)

[I or T] to make a very loud and unpleasant noise: guns/music blasting (away/out)

blast verb (CRITICIZE)

[T] informal to criticize someone or something severely: The government was blasted by the opposition for failing to create jobs.
Phrasal verbs

blast

noun [C] uk   /blɑːst/ us    /blæst/

blast noun [C] (EXPLOSION)

an explosion: Three people were injured in the blast.

blast noun [C] (AIR)

a sudden strong blow of air: A blast of cold air hit him as he opened the window.

blast noun [C] (NOISE)

a sudden loud noise: a blast of music The headteacher blew three blasts on a whistle.

blast noun [C] (EVENT)

[usually singular] US informal an exciting or enjoyable experience or event, often a party: You should have come with us last night - we had a real blast!

blast

exclamation uk   /blɑːst/ us    /blæst/ (also blast it) old-fashioned informal
an expression of anger: Oh blast! I've left my keys at home!
(Definition of blast from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of blast?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “blast” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

see the light of day

When something sees the light of day, it appears for the first time.

Word of the Day

Highly delighted, bitterly disappointed, ridiculously cheap: adverbs for emphasis.

by Liz Walter,
October 22, 2014
We often make adjectives stronger by putting an adverb in front of them. The most common ones are very and, for a stronger meaning, extremely: He was very pleased. The ship is extremely large. However, we don’t use very or extremely for adjectives that already have a strong meaning, for example fantastic,

Read More 

life tracking noun

October 20, 2014
the use of one or more devices or apps to monitor health, exercise, how time is spent, etc.

Read More