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English definition of “blast”

blast

verb uk   /blɑːst/ us    /blæst/

blast verb (EXPLODE)

[I or T] to explode or destroy something or someone with explosives, or to break through or hit something with a similar, very strong force: A tunnel was to be blasted through the mountains. They heard the guns blasting away all night.figurative Their latest album blasted (its way) up the charts (= moved very quickly because of its popularity).
See also

blast verb (NOISE)

[I or T] to make a very loud and unpleasant noise: guns/music blasting (away/out)

blast verb (CRITICIZE)

[T] informal to criticize someone or something severely: The government was blasted by the opposition for failing to create jobs.
Phrasal verbs

blast

noun [C] uk   /blɑːst/ us    /blæst/

blast noun [C] (EXPLOSION)

an explosion: Three people were injured in the blast.

blast noun [C] (AIR)

a sudden strong blow of air: A blast of cold air hit him as he opened the window.

blast noun [C] (NOISE)

a sudden loud noise: a blast of music The headteacher blew three blasts on a whistle.

blast noun [C] (EVENT)

[usually singular] US informal an exciting or enjoyable experience or event, often a party: You should have come with us last night - we had a real blast!

blast

exclamation uk   /blɑːst/ us    /blæst/ (also blast it) old-fashioned informal
an expression of anger: Oh blast! I've left my keys at home!
(Definition of blast from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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