boot definition, meaning - what is boot in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “boot”

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boot

noun uk   us   /buːt/

boot noun (SHOE)

A1 [C] a type of shoe that covers the whole foot and the lower part of the leg: walking boots riding boots
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boot noun (CAR)

B1 [C] UK (US trunk) a covered space at the back of a car, for storing things in: I always keep a blanket and a toolkit in the boot for emergencies. Stolen goods were found in the boot of her car.

boot noun (END)

the boot [S] informal the situation in which your job is taken away from you, usually because you have done something wrong or badly: She got the boot for stealing money from the cash register. Williams has been given the boot from the team.

boot noun (KICK)

[C] UK informal a kick with the foot: He gave the ball a good boot.

boot noun (WHEEL)

[C] US (also Denver boot, UK wheel clamp) a metal device attached to the wheel of an illegally parked car that will only be removed when the owner pays an amount of money

boot

verb uk   us   /buːt/

boot verb (KICK)

[T usually + adv/prep] informal to kick someone or something hard with the foot: They booted him in the head.

boot verb (COMPUTER)

[I or T] (also boot up) When a computer boots (up), it becomes ready for use by getting the necessary information into its memory, and when you boot (up) a computer, you cause it to do this.
(Definition of boot from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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