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English definition of “bounce”

bounce

verb uk   /baʊns/ us  

bounce verb (JUMP)

B1 [I or T] to (cause to) move up or away after hitting a surface: The ball bounced off the post and into the net. She bounced the ball quickly. Her bag bounced (= moved up and down) against her side as she walked. The children had broken the bed by bouncing (= jumping up and down) on it. He bounced the baby (= lifted it up and down) on his knee.figurative Television pictures from all over the world are bounced off satellites (= are sent to and returned from them). B2 [I usually + adv/prep] to move in an energetic and enthusiastic manner: Tom bounced in, smiling broadly.

bounce verb (NOT PAY)

[I or T] informal to (cause a cheque to) not be paid or accepted by a bank because there is no money in the account: I had to pay a penalty fee when my cheque bounced. To my horror the bank bounced the cheque.

bounce verb (EMAIL)

C2 [I or T] If an email that you send bounces or is bounced, it comes back to you because the address is wrong or there is a computer problem.

bounce

noun [C or U] uk   /baʊns/ us  
the act of bouncing, or the quality that makes something able to bounce: In tennis you have to hit the ball before its second bounce.figurative This shampoo will give your hair bounce (= make it look attractively thick) and shine.
(Definition of bounce from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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