brace definition, meaning - what is brace in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “brace”

See all translations

brace

noun uk   us   /breɪs/

brace noun (SUPPORT)

[C] (plural braces) something that is used to support or connect things, or to make something stronger: He was recently fitted with a brace for his bad back. [C] UK (US braces [plural]) (plural braces) a set of connected wires that is attached to a person's teeth in order to make them straight: I had to wear a brace for my crooked teeth when I was a teenager.braces [plural] UK (US suspenders) a pair of narrow straps that stretch from the front of the trousers over your shoulders to the back to hold them up: a pair of braces US (UK calipers) metal supports that are fastened to the legs of people who have difficulties with walking

brace noun (PAIR)

[C] (plural brace) two things of the same type, especially two wild birds that have been killed for sport or food: a brace of pheasants

brace

verb [T] uk   us   /breɪs/

brace verb [T] (SUPPORT)

to support an object in order to stop it from falling down: The side wall of the old house was braced with a wooden support.

brace verb [T] (PREPARE)

brace yourself to prepare yourself physically or mentally for something unpleasant: The passengers were told to brace themselves (= to press their bodies hard against something or hold them very stiff) for a crash landing. She told me she had some bad news for me and I braced myself for a shock.
(Definition of brace from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of brace?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “brace” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

cup tie

a game between two teams trying to win a cup (= prize), especially in football

Word of the Day

What’s All The Commotion About? (Words to describe sounds)

by Kate Woodford,
May 20, 2015
​​​ In this post we look at a range of words and phrases that we use to describe noise and the absence of noise. Starting with complete quiet, we sometimes use the noun hush to describe silence: A hush fell over the room as the bride walked in./There was a deathly hush (=complete

Read More 

ancestral health noun

May 25, 2015
diet based on the presumed diet of our Palaeolithic ancestors ‘Ancestral health,’ to use a term popular among Paleo followers, has gone mass.

Read More