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English definition of “bright”

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bright

adjective uk   /braɪt/ us  

bright adjective (LIGHT)

B1 full of light, shining: bright sunshine The rooms were bright and airy. The lights are too bright in here - they're hurting my eyes. A bright star was shining in the East. When she looked up her eyes were bright with tears. In 2009 I moved to New York, attracted by the bright lights (= the promise of excitement) of the city.
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bright adjective (COLOUR)

A2 strong in colour: Leslie always wears bright colours. He said hello and I felt my face turn bright red. a bright shade of green
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bright adjective (INTELLIGENT)

B2 intelligent and quick to learn: They were bright children, always asking questions. She was enthusiastic and full of bright ideas and suggestions.
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bright adjective (HAPPY)

B2 full of hope for success or happiness: You're very bright and cheerful this morning. Things are starting to look brighter for British businesses. She's an excellent student with a bright future.
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brightness
noun [U] uk   /ˈbraɪt.nəs/ us  
The brightness of the snow made him blink.
brightly
adverb uk   /ˈbraɪt.li/ us  
B2 a brightly lit room Clowns often wear brightly coloured clothing. Despite her fear, she spoke brightly to the group.

bright

noun uk   /braɪt/ us  
brights [plural] US informal A car's brights are its headlights (= the powerful lights at the front)when they are brightest and aimed straight ahead.
(Definition of bright from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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