bright Meaning, definition in Cambridge English Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of "bright" - English Dictionary

See all translations

brightadjective

uk   us   /braɪt/

bright adjective (LIGHT)

B1 full of light, shining: bright sunshine The rooms were bright and airy. The lights are too bright in here - they're hurting my eyes. A bright star was shining in the East. When she looked up her eyes were bright with tears. In 2009 I moved to New York, attracted by the bright lights (= the promise of excitement) of the city.
More examples

bright adjective (COLOUR)

A2 strong in colour: Leslie always wears bright colours. He said hello and I felt my face turn bright red. a bright shade of green
More examples

bright adjective (INTELLIGENT)

B2 intelligent and quick to learn: They were bright children, always asking questions. She was enthusiastic and full of bright ideas and suggestions.
More examples

bright adjective (HAPPY)

B2 full of hope for success or happiness: You're very bright and cheerful this morning. Things are starting to look brighter for British businesses. She's an excellent student with a bright future.
More examples
brightness
noun [U] uk   us   /ˈbraɪt.nəs/
The brightness of the snow made him blink.
brightly
adverb uk   us   /ˈbraɪt.li/
B2 a brightly lit room Clowns often wear brightly coloured clothing. Despite her fear, she spoke brightly to the group.

brightnoun

uk   us   /braɪt/
brights [plural] US informal A car's brights are its headlights (= the powerful lights at the front)when they are brightest and aimed straight ahead.
(Definition of bright from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of bright?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “bright” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day
straight

the straight part of a racetrack (= the track on which competitors race)

Word of the Day

Are you a glass-half-full person? (Everyday Idioms)
Are you a glass-half-full person? (Everyday Idioms)
by Kate Woodford,
July 29, 2015
A reader of this blog recently asked for a post on idioms that are used in everyday English. This seemed like a reasonable request. After all, if you are going to make the effort to learn a set of English idioms, you want those idioms to be useful. The question, then, was

Read More 

exoskeleton noun
exoskeleton noun
July 27, 2015
a robotic device which goes around the legs and part of the body of a person who cannot walk and allows them to move independently and in an upright position The device, known as an exoskeleton, is strapped to the outside of a person’s limbs and can then be controlled by them.

Read More